This is one of our most popular dishes in The Duck, using the best monkfish delivered daily from Kilmore Quay in Wexford. Always a crowd pleaser. A delicious late summer alternative to the caper salsa is a classic Provencal Pistou sauce made with a clove of garlic, pinch of sea salt, a bunch of basil leaves and half a cup of extra virgin olive oil, blended or ground to a paste in a pestle and mortar.

Serves 4


  • 5 carrots, diced
  • 1 celeriac, diced
  • 3 courgettes, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 100ml white wine
  • 200ml fish stock
  • 200ml cream
  • 4x160g monkfish, trimmed from sinew
  • 100g pitted black Kalamata olives
  • 2 bunches scallions, sliced
  • 5 tablespoons herb oil, see recipe
  • 5 tablespoons caper salsa, see recipe
  • 2 lemons, juice only
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 20g chives
  • 20g dill
  • 20g chervil
  • 20g flat parsley
  • 50ml olive oil
  • 200g mini capers
  • 2 punnet cherry tomatoes
  • 1 bunch scallions, sliced
  • 200ml rapeseed oil
  • 50g flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 100g white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt


1 Make your herb oil simply by combining all herbs and oil in a blender.

2 Make up your salsa by draining off the juice from the capers, then quarter your cherry tomatoes, add your spring onions and the rest of the ingredients.

3 Turn on your oven and preheat to 180ºC/gas mark 4.

4 Lightly fry the carrots, courgette, celeriac and garlic in oil for about eight minutes, add the white wine and reduce by half, then add your fish stock and cream, simmer for a further three minutes, add herb oil and allow to reduce to thicken slightly and the vegetables are cooked.

5 While your vegetable and sauce are reducing, seal off your monkfish in butter and oil and place in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from oven and allow the monkfish to rest for five minutes.

6 To serve, assemble the vegetables and sauce in a shallow bowl, place the monkfish on top, sprinkle over the olives and top with your caper salsa and some lemon wedges.

Tip: Make sure the monkfish is trimmed of any sinew to prevent it from being tough.

Photography credit: Harry Weir, assisted by Brian Clarke

Recipe credit: The Duck at Marlfield House