Milli julli handi machli

Mixed seafood ‘hot pot’

Kinara means ‘At the water’s edge’ so it’s only fitting that we kick off with some of the bounty of the wonderful seafood on our doorstep. This one is a hot pot type dish that can easily be put together for entertaining friends with no stress or panic, allowing you to enjoy your guests’ company rather than be fussing over different garnishes and plating up. I’m sure there’s no science behind it, but it tastes nicer cooked in a clay pot, so if there’s one lurking in your cupboard, now’s the time to crack it out. 

Serves 4


  • 4 shallots or 1 large onion, finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped ginger
  • Olive oil
  • 1 decent pinch sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon chilli powder
  • 1 tablespoon turmeric
  • 1 tablespoon coriander powder
  • 1 tablespoon cumin powder
  • 1 decent pinch mustard seeds
  • 4 ripe tomatoes, roughly chopped or 1 tin of good quality chopped tomatoes
  • 12 Dublin bay prawns
  • 300g cod or hake fillets, cubed
  • 300g mussels, cleaned
  • 90g squid
  • 100ml coconut milk
  • 2 limes, juice only
  • 25g fresh coriander leaves


1 This first part can be done in advance and gets a lovely aroma in the house for when guests arrive. Sweat the onions, garlic and ginger in a quick glug of oil and gently give it a bit of colour, then add the salt, spices and mustard seeds and get them kicking up a nice bit of flavour and fragrance. Then add the chopped tomatoes.

2 Gently simmer this for 15-20 minutes until its stewed down nicely and the tomatoes have that lovely, juicy cooked flavour and have deepened in colour.

3 Now it’s time to add the seafood and coconut milk. Pop the lid on the pot and gently simmer for 5-6 minutes. Agitate the mussels a couple of times to get them to open (the weight of a piece of tomato or such can stop them from opening – so give them a bit of room).

4 Finish with a squeeze of lime juice and the freshly torn coriander leaves

Tip: We grind our spices freshly every day, and a coffee grinder or pestle and mortar is perfect for this, but, let’s be honest – nobody is going to judge you for buying spice powders. Just make sure to fry them first to get them going flavour-wise and to knock off that powdery taste they can have.

Recipe credit: Kinara Kitchen

Photography credit: Harry Weir, assisted by Brian Clarke